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Five Tips on Making Your Online Learning More Accessible: Home

Hyperlinks

Hyperlinks

Text Design

Text Design

  • High contrast - light background with dark-colored font.
  • Avoid yellow-blue or red-green combinations because individuals with color blindness have difficulty differentiating.
  • Less is more - avoid unnecessary formatting. Use bolds and italics sparingly
  • Underlining should be reserved for hyperlinks.
  • Use sans serif font for readability.
  • A sans serif font does not use any unnecessary strokes in its letters.

 

This is an example of a serif font.

This is an example of a sans serif font.

Images/Graphics

Images/Graphics

  • Relevant to the content
  • Clear and easy to see (preferably in high resolution)
  • Avoid animated or blinking images - this isn't the 90s!
  • Use alt text (alternative text) to write descriptions of the image. Most learning management systems (LMS) have a way to include this when adding a graphic.

 

This is the logo for Charlotte AHEC.

Audio/Visual

Audio/Visual

  • Clear audio and video with minimal background noise.
  • Avoid blurred refocusing and excessive movement like "shaky cam."
  • Both audio and visual files should have written transcriptions (closed captioning).
  • Try to keep the videos short. 3-10 minutes is optimal.
  • If the content takes longer, try to break it up into segments.

Documents

Documents

  • All text should be searchable within the document.
  • If a document (like a PDF) isn't searchable, an accompanying text version should be made available.
  • Any table or chart should have identifying headers and labels, as well as summaries.
  • There should be an accessibility statement for learners which outlines any ADA procedures.

Information based on "5-Tips for ADA-Compliant Inclusive Design," by Salena Rabidoux and Amy Rottmann. Inside Higher Ed, May 3, 2017